Here’s what’s happening at the library!

  I have been lucky enough to have loved three men in my life.  Is that too much information for a library article?
     None of those three were/are avid readers as compared to the men that visit this library.  Although, if you do not get technical about what is considered reading, Grass & Grain, Successful Farming, The Hanover News, and The Westmoreland Recorder were read from front to back.
     Now just like Mother’s Day, people tend to reminisce around these Hallmark holidays.  It is actually a fairly new national holiday.  It was in 1972 when President Richard Nixon declared it be celebrated on the third Sunday in June as was first suggested by Grace Clayton from West Virginia in 1908.  She wanted a day to honor her father and the 200 fathers who had died in a mining accident in her state.  Two others, including President Woodrow Wilson, tried to make it a permanent national holiday before the 1972 declaration.
     I was told to give a list of books in the library article, but if these fathers are like most, they judge the book by its cover.  Know that new titles are ordered at the end of each month.  Black Book, El Paso, Edge, The Highwayman, Night School, Billy Lynn’s Long Half-time Walk, and A Wretched and Precarious Situation are just a few of the new titles that the fathers and men ought to enjoy.  Speaking of new, the Rotating Book Van will rotate another 350 titles into the library on June 29. You really have to come in and “judge” for yourself.
     The three men I have loved, you ask?  The first was named Julius (my dad), another one was Ludwig (my father-in-law), and for 31 years another great father to our three children, Galen.
     Mark Twain once said, “When I was a boy of 14, my father was so ignorant I could hardly stand to have the old man around.  But when I got to be 21, I was astonished at how much he had learned in seven years.”
     Happy Father’s Day Reading!

Here’s what’s happening at the library!

Did you hear that this year’s summer reading program’s theme is Build a Better World?  This is not a repeat of last week’s article, only an extension.
     Small towns have a lot of advantages to large impersonal cities.  People get to see the same blockbuster movies as the big cities at half the price.  If you wait a bit, those movies are free at the library.
     They have quality stage productions at the Opera House from talented local performers to professional actors, comedians, and musicians.
     The Weaver Hotel offers beautiful accommodations while attending anything you may be in town for.
     How about dining?  Burger Bashes, Boy Scout 1/2 Chicken Barbeques, church dinners, and more, offer wonderful meals, reasonably priced, and proceeds always going for something worthwhile.
     Most importantly, small towns have caring groups that offer their time, money, ideas, and energy to those needing help.
     The Annual River Run, sponsored by many including this library, took place this past weekend with fun for everyone and proceeds going to a worthy one near and dear to my heart.
     A local patron returned a small piece of audio equipment and a stack of audio books for free return from the State Library of Kansas after her mother had passed away.  She said the audiobooks “saved her life” during her stay.  She hoped others in the local care home and those homebound would take advantage of this free service. (Select magazines are also available.)
     Build a Better World by not only attending these events, but… (this article wouldn’t seem right if the library wasn’t mentioned) send a birthday wish to the chosen community members, or Father’s Day cards to 9 of those community men from the library, or donating gently used items to the Warehouse, or donating once watched or read books and movies to the library.
     Build that Better World by sending cards, donating, or returning items to the library for others to enjoy, or paying the fines for those overdue movies and books.  (Fine money is used for new movies, copier paper and ink, magazine subscriptions, cards, stamps, etc.)
Knock, knock.
Who’s there?
Winnie.
Winnie who?
Winnie you going to bring back that overdue book/movie, hmmm?
Happy Building!

Here’s what’s happening at the library!

“Build a Better World” is the summer reading theme for public libraries this summer.  What will you do to make our world better?  My suggestion is to READ, no matter your age.  Become more aware, become more literate, become well read.
     Reading gives you all the tools to build better futures, relationships, senses of humor, dreams, imaginations, life, lunches, skills, world peace, and on and on.
     If you don’t know how to do something from fixing cars to fixing supper – read “how to” books.  Want to know how the rich and famous live?….read a bibliography.  Want to have some insight into the future?…sci-fi books may help.  Star Trek, Lost in Space, and the Jetsons weren’t too far off.  Want a little love in your life?…..read a romance novel.  Don’t want to make the same mistakes?….read some history.
     Build a well read young child…picture books.
     Build a better tween…..junior fiction.
     Build a better teen…..young adult selections.
     Build a better student for next fall……READ!
     A little girl came into the library wanting to know what she would “get” if she read books this summer.  I didn’t have the time or energy to explain to her what I wrote above.  It was a gold star in my day and I was thrilled seeing them on my reading log.
     There will be small prizes given to coincide with our world theme, but don’t expect huge incentives to get you to read, that needs to come from within.
     My challenge to you this summer is to think how your book connects to world events, world news, world happenings.
     TOGETHER, Waterville, we’ll build a better world over the summer. You’ll see!
Happy Summer Reading!

Here’s what’s happening at the library!

As a child, I would hear my Grandma Nanny talk of Decoration Day.  I got the honor, although I didn’t know that then, but the honor of going to Sunset Cemetery in Manhattan and “decorating” my Great Grandma and Grandpa’s graves with Nanny’s own garden grown flowers.  Her hillside of peonies were still in bloom as I recall.  Never did I tire of the stories of Great Grandparents “Bang” and Fritz.
      I would then get the chance to go with my folks to decorate my Grandma and Grandpa Umscheid’s graves in the St. Joseph’s Cemetery at Flush.  For years now, my mother and her sister have taken over that task and I feel guilty not visiting those graves and many more since, especially on Memorial Day.
     Decoration Day started on May 30, 1868 to decorate the graves of Civil War soldiers.  Twenty years later, the name of the day was changed to Memorial Day, still to honor the men and women who died in all the wars.
     Once again, we have taken this honored day of remembrance to light up our grills, get the boats out on the lakes, go to a blockbuster movie, or take in Memorial Day sales.
     Before Memorial Day this year, come to the library to read stories, glance at Waterville memorabilia brought in by Ann Walter and others, or go to local cemetery services for the men and women we should honor before our own festivities begin.
     Check out a military related book or two on Waterville’s Nickel Day Saturday and READ your way into the beginning of summer.
     “I’m proud to be an American,
      Where at least I know I’m free,
      And I won’t forget the men who died
      Who gave that right to me.” -L. Greenwood
Welcome to Nickel Day and Happy Memorial Day!

Here’s what’s happening at the library!

What can be said about Moms that hasn’t been said before?  Not much.
     Their skills, styles, personalities are as varied as the number of books in this library.  Some are filled with lots of laughter and humor.  Some are sad with lots of hardships.  Some are exciting with adventure each step or page of the way. Still others are filled with facts or matter of facts.
     If you are lucky, you’ve had a mixture of a little bit of everything, but those novels and moms are rare.  Not many get to be labeled a classic. (Judged over a period of time to be of the highest quality and outstanding of its kind.)  And, you can’t judge the book or the mom by its cover.  Many turn out to be some of best, despite their outer layer.
     No one should every say that motherhood is an “easy read” either.  But if you knew how hard something was going to be, you’d never start it, and if you never started it, you wouldn’t know how wonderful, gratifying, thought provoking it can be.
     Sometimes it takes after the book finished or mother is gone before you realize how much you learned from them. Don’t you remember learning these from your mom?
Never give up. (The Little Engine that Could)
Treasure friendships. (Winnie the Pooh)
Help others. (Charlotte’s Web)
Every story has two sides. (The True Story of Three Little Pigs)
Don’t judge. (Pride and Prejudice)
Don’t try to change others. (To Kill a Mockingbird)
Being smart is not something to be ashamed of. (Harry Potter)
Family is always the most important. (Hunger Games)
Define yourself. (Anne of Green Gables)
Words are valuable and insanely powerful. (The Book Thief)
Happy Mother’s Day……Reading!

Here’s what’s happening at the library!

Let’s talk about passion.  No, let’s not go in the direction you are thinking,……but it sure got your attention.
     Let’s talk about the kind of passion that shows when someone talks about the theater, or music, their honey bees, rescuing animals, the railroad, history, vintage cars, gardening, quilting, teaching, writing, or books.
     Passion is defined as a strong and barely controllable emotion caused by strong feelings or beliefs.
     The first time I witnessed or even thought about passion was through a class I was taking called Ag in the Classroom.  We had gotten to see many farms, but this particular one was father/son operated.
     The son proudly showed the GPS driven tractor to our class and what it could do and what he didn’t have to.  It was then the father’s turn.  He told of a new irrigation system that was purchased after many years of trying to outsmart Mother Nature.  He did not brag about the new system, but merely stated that life and crop outcomes were going to be a bit better and easier.  Tensions were not going to run as high during those low to no moisture seasons, and in turn, could be spent with the other passion in his life….his wife, diagnosed with early signs of Alzheimer’s, as the tears welled up in his eyes telling us their 50 year story.
     Real passion isn’t heard.  Real passion is shown.
     The old cliché of actions speaking louder that words come into play here.
     Storytellers show their passion for romance, mystery, or murder through their writing.  You can feel their passion through the words they use.
     I’ve been very passionate about buying best sellers at the end of every month and many take advantage of being the first to grab them from the shelf.
Knock, Knock.
Who’s there?
Passion.
Passion who?
If you’re passion through town sometime, stop in!
Happy Reading!

Here’s what’s happening at the library!

  Earlier articles written in the Telegraph mention the word “opportunities” and not just in this library section.  The opportunity to hear a guest singer at the Opera House, an opportunity to meet a visiting author, an opportunity to watch young actors from our local schools perform, or an opportunity to read to our young preschoolers were some of those opportunities.
     We get many opportunities, but do we take advantage of them when we can? Guilty!  We make excuses to not going because of prior commitments, tired from the day, or not in the mood to go.  Most opportunities only come around once. Then there is the feeling of regret missing such opportunities.  Always!
     A patron grabbed a book of interest from the Rotating Books because it will be rotated out on the 27th of this month. Almost a missed opportunity.
     A patron almost missed the chance to send a birthday card to an older neighbor that will be celebrating it at the end of the month.  A dodged missed opportunity.
     A patron came in after many weeks, checked out a book, and thanked the library for the birthday cards he received in February as he has never had his birthday recognized.
     It’s fun being a witness to these opportunities. And, there was the chance to read to local preschoolers about Earth Day, trees, and finding shelter Beneath the Sun.  They discussed that cool places could be in the water, under a rock, or urinating down your leg as a vulture does to keep cool.  All are fine ways to cool off, but seeking shade under a tree is probably the best for us.
     Getting to be the first to read the “new” books in the library  becomes an opportunity that many do not want to miss.  They seem to think that once they are placed on the back shelves, the opportunity to read them has gone.  The great thing about good books is they will always have a home in the library and the opportunity to read them  will never be fleeting!
     Knock, knock.
     Who’s there?
     Opportunity.
     No way!  Opportunity only knocks once!
Happy reading opportunities!

Here’s what’s happening at the library!

Do you ever notice that right after a holiday is over…..it’s over?  Businesses advertise weeks, if not months before the celebration and immediately after the celebration day, there are no signs it ever was celebrated.
     Here’s to hoping that the past Thanksgiving, Christmas, New Years, Valentines, and now Easter celebrations with family and friends are not forgotten, but later, bits and pieces of it remembered and stored in our memory banks.
     In last week’s Library Happenings, it was mentioned that librarians get the opportunity to hone their library skills for the library and its patrons.  A two day workshop for new directors was held at Junction City’s Rock Springs 4-H Center.  Talk about memories!
     Stories of 4-H camps, cheerleader camps, family get-togethers, business retreats, or church group gatherings filled our down time Tuesday evening.  No one was left out of the conversations.  This conference was held for new directors from across the state and people would swear that these strangers had known each other all of their lives.
     Books tend to be like those holidays.  Excitement about the arrival of new titles fill the library. People are anxious to get their hands on them.  Then it’s over.  But later, certain events or conversations conjure up memories from portions of a read book that meant something to them……just like those holiday memories.
     Often, “we don’t know we’re making memories, we just know we’re having fun!” -AA Milne, Winnie the Pooh

Here’s what’s happening at the library!

   Ever have one of those “awww” moments?  Not “a-ha, now I know” moments, but cute puppy “awww” moments.
     Let  me digress a bit.
     One hundred eleven years ago in April of 1906, a committee was formed to “agitate” this community into forming a public library.  Six months later a traveling library was sent for and books were then kept in the Eli Peterson store.
     Traveling libraries would be compared to our bookmobiles or book vans of today.  It was said that as early as 1831 in the United States, traveling libraries provided their book service to American ships, naval hospitals, life-saving stations, and lighthouses.
     Committee members and those interested in this library endeavor were each assessed 10 cents to help with the transportation of those books.  Five years later, in 1911, the first bookcase was bought for $5.  Book socials, talent benefits, and lecture courses were set up as fund raisers  for the library.  In March, 103 years ago, the Waterville Public Library was finally opened.
     Waterville should be very proud of those library pioneers for their vision and push into establishing the beautiful library that it is today.  It continues to be supported by those people that believe “”reading is essential”.
    Now the “awww” moment.
    A young patron of the library came in, handed me a letter, and stood as I read his young student’s writing.
     The confession stated that he had lost the cover to a library owned item and asked if the library would please take the newly purchased title to replace the lost one and wave his overdue fines.  The note also said that he would try to be more responsible in the future with borrowed items.
     Awwww, what could I do?
     Those are the kinds of parents that use those teachable moments to their children that will continue to make this library an important part of this community.
     Martin Luther King, Jr. said, “The time is always right to do what is right”, and,
                                                                                          
 Knock, knock.
Who’s there?
Dishes.
Dishes who?
Dishes such a nice library. Let’s keep it that way.
Happy Continued Reading!

Here’s what’s happening at the library!

Have you ever forgotten if you’ve read a book?  Have you ever taken boxes of fresh meat to your son’s house, put it in the freezer, and forgotten whether you shut the lid?….it’s a long story.  Have you ever left the house wondering if you turned off the stove, flipped a switch, or locked a door?
     It’s not Deja vu (a feeling of having already experienced the present situation).  It’s called Goldfish Memory Syndrome according to Google.  I asked a library patron, who is also a nurse, about it.  She explained to me that we put ourselves in the midst of stressors. We overload our brains by trying to multitask. We are answering phones or texting while washing dishes, fixing supper, caring for the kids, going to our jobs, etc..  Our brains were built to do one thing at a time, so some things get….pushed out of our short term memories.
     “They” say that exercising the brain fights against that syndrome. It sounds logical.  That’s why, being associated with a library, I need to push the brain exercise by enticing you to come in and grab a good book, a magazine, a seasonal dot-to-dot, a coloring sheet, or any other MindWare activities I have placed on the round activity table. Many patrons think that these are for the children……uhhh, no.  About 75% of the patrons coming into this library are adults….just sayin’.
     Keep reading, dot-to-dotting, coloring, or writing.  Send a little love by signing
a seasonal card, holiday card, or birthday card to our select members of the community.  A birthday will be celebrated towards the end of this month, St. Patrick’s Day is Friday the 17th with another small celebration, and Spring arrives on Monday the 20th.
     Multitasking can cause memory loss….and worse, memory loss.
Remember to READ!