Here’s what’s happening at the library!

Do you get emotionally involved with the characters in a book?  Do the authors write so well and use such descriptive language within that book that you are pulled into the story hook, line, and sinker?  Come on, admit it!
     I was in The Shack and felt the loss of that kidnapped little girl.
     I was out in the Wild hiking along that Pacific Crest Trail.
     I was sitting on that park bench with that grandparent thinking And Every Morning the Way Home Gets Longer and Longer.
     Reading can be exhausting!
     A patron came into the library wanting to Inner Library Loan a book for her fifth grade daughter.  She stated that she was pleasantly surprised and excited at the quality of books available for students.  This also gave this young mom, an avid reader herself, a chance to discuss tween topics in the book with her daughter.  What better way to connect with a child or any age group than through a book?
     Did you “connect” with last week’s grandparent memories?  Do these memories take you back to a time with your grandparents?
“Grandma was the tester for making knip.” -K. Richter
“There’s no place like home.” -Bryson
“Grandma Red loved my brake checks.”
“Grandma Argo-good cook, Grandpa Argo-good hunter.”
“I miss you, Grandma Hora, I love you. You made the best cookies.”
“Grandma Umscheid makes the best no-bakes.”
“Grandpa Jim helped me with my homework.”
“When Grandma made Barbie clothes and colored with the wrong color.” -Libby
“My Grandma made the best cookies.”
“I love you Grandma.” -Royce
“Grandpa Umscheid loved his puppy chow and occasionally shared.”
“My Grandma makes the best green bean casserole.” -MH
“My grandparents always had me over Monday nights for wrestling.” -Crystal
“We love singing with Grandpa John, and we miss Grandma Annie and Grandpa Michael.” -Hadley and Harper
“Grandpa Umscheid gave me a ceramic pig cookie jar for taking care of runt pigs.”
“Grandpa Bill, every time he saw me, he started singing, K-K-Katie.”
“Grandma Joyce is the best babysitter ever.”
“We love going to Pizza Hut with Grandpa Brant.”
Knock, Knock.
Who’s there?
Tank.
Tank who?
Tank you for sharing your grandparent memories.
Happy Reading!

Here’s what’s happening at the library!

The library window was decorated for Grandparent’s Day and over 40 memories were written on the activity table. Did you make a memory for this year’s Grandparent’s Day?
     Like books, there was absolutely no thought of throwing the comment paper out, so it was decided that patrons of the library would write this week’s article by reliving all those mini-memories and writing about those fond recollections of their times with grandparents.  Here are half of them with more to follow next week:
“Bingo with Grandma Roepke.”
“My Grandparents paid me $50 to get his chew!-Cory
“Traveled and went everywhere with my grandparents.” – C. Argo
“She is nice and fun.” -Alex
“Grandma always had the best cookies and a lot of flowers.” -Donna
“Grandpa and Grandma always give me the right thing.” -Emily
“When we celebrate Grandpa and my birthday.” -Tessa
“They all make awesome food.” -Alexis
“Grandma King ran the post office and general store in Fostoria.”
“Nanny let me have a fashion show with all her shoes.”
“I remember my grandma pickled watermelon rinds into the best pickles in the world, and my grandparents had a fancy WPA outhouse.” -NN
“My grandma makes the best homemade ice cream.” -Ciarra
“Grandma Strader (Anna), I miss the talks…I still have so many questions to ask.”
“Grandma Pralle gives the best advice and would let me win at Go Fish.”
“Bang made the best canned Campbells Chicken Noodle soup.”
“Grandma had the same color hair as me, and I remember both on the farm and playing baseball at Frankfort Cemetery.” -Sharon T-King
“Grandpa Morris played donkey baseball at Frankfort.”
“Granny taught me how to quilt.” -S. McIntyre
“Grandma makes the best banana bread.”
“My grandfather was a little forgetful, but he liked to give me advice; one day he took me aside and left me there.” -unknown
Happy Memoir Reading!

Here’s what’s happening at the library!

Grandparent’s Day is Sunday, September 10.  FYI.  Although it is one of those observances that need not be celebrated ON the day, but at anytime during the year.
     A woman named Marian MaQuade hoped for a day to honor grandparents, and in 1978 President Jimmy Carter declared that the first Sunday after Labor Day be Grandparent’s Day.  As recently as 2012, President Obama proclaimed the “wonderful contributions grandparents make to our lives”.
     Fun fact.  Grandparent’s Day has an official flower – the Forget-Me-Not.  Johnny Prill wrote the official song for the special day, “A Song for Grandma and Grandpa”.  Check it out on YouTube.
     Looking for these fun facts led the search to another grandparent related song by Kenny Chesney called “Grandpa Told Me So”. This is also on YouTube.
     Speaking of grandparent related songs, for many years as Frankfort Schools celebrated Grandparent’s Day with the students, The Judds had a song that was played simply titled “Grandpa”.  That particular song became a little less uplifting as the years went by.  Give it a listen and give me your opinion.
     Grandparents are usually the ones that introduce stories, reading, and books to their grandchildren.   Parents are so busy with jobs, running the household, outside activities, and being exhausted at the end of the day, that reading seems far from part of the daily routine.
     My Grandma Nanny read the Mother Goose nursery rhymes, and many, many Little Golden Books to me growing up.  They were always in that special basket in her breezeway.  Her lap was my chair of choice.
     Being first time grandparents for two years now, I hope we’re those grandparents that instill a love of reading to little Kaden.  Right now, board books with tractors, hay bales, and neigh, neighs seem to be the trend, but I see Tip and Mitten, The Three Pigs, The Little Engine That Could, The Cat in the Hat, The Ugly Duckling, If You Give a Mouse a Cookie……sorry, I have to go and dig these out!
My grandson asked me how old I was.
“I’m not sure,” I teasingly said.
“Look in your underwear, Grandma,” he advised. “Mine says I’m 4 to 6”.
Happy Grandparent’s Day!

Here’s what’s happening at the library!

“How did you spend your summer vacation?”
     Students all across the nation are being asked that question at the beginning of school.  In 32 years of teaching, I found that many students forgot what they had done over those activity packed 3 months.  It would come back to them when a familiar sight, sound, song, or smell hit them, but it is difficult to remember everything.  Maybe the reason is they do not have to remember that information to be tested or drilled on.  Maybe that type of information goes hand-in-hand with the students’ “summer slide” that has been a proven educational problem for many years.  About two months of learning is lost throughout the summer break and for most students, that is two months too much.
     Fun fact.  In the 1800’s, students were kept at home during the summer to help out with summer farm work while a big city’s school year would be 248 days long.
     Debates continue on whether year round school would be more advantageous for students with several breaks being placed strategically throughout the year.  In 1973, 15 states, including our neighbor, Colorado, adopted a year round school calendar.  Some studies say that without the long summer break, students do slightly better.
     Needless to say, learning needs to continue throughout days, months, years, and no matter the age.
     A reminder to those of you that do not wish to spend a lot on college classes, the State Library of Kansas has over 500 Universal Classes to take for fun, knowledge, continuing education credit, and a certificate for…get this…FREE at kslib.info.
     Maybe teachers need to be asking, “What didn’t you get to do this summer?”  Just a suggestion.
     Knock, Knock.
     Who’s there?
     Spell.
     Spell who?
     W-H-O.
Happy Back to School Reading!

Here’s what’s happening at the library!

The Powerball Jackpot is up to $650 million.  Even with the odds being 1 in 292 million of winning, a person can dream.
     What would you do with all that money?  That would have been a great library round table question to ask our patrons.  My family members tend to have a difficult time deciding what to spend $25 on from gift card, much less $650 million!
     It’s difficult to even fathom what you could do with that amount of money, but I think I would start out with new carpet for my family room as we’ve had it far past its life expectancy. I’d like a new dishwasher.  It failed me about a year ago.  The “check-engine” light on my vehicle has been on for quite a while, but my mechanic son and husband said a piece of electrical tape placed over it would suffice.
     People hit the lottery all the time.  Seeing the eclipse was a win.  A perfect job, a great marriage, children that are healthy and doing well are pretty big wins.  How about those even smaller lottery wins like finding a much wanted item on sale, seeing an old friend in unexpected places, finding money at the bottom of the washing machine, winning Bingo at a church bazaar, finding pretty feathers with a grandchild?  Must I go on with my recent lottery winnings?
     How about finding a good book and reading that happy surprise ending?
     Feeling bad about not winning the $650 million? Don’t, because for some reason the lottery keeps giving my money to someone else! 
     Come on into the library a pick a sure winner.
Happy Reading!

Here’s what’s happening at the library!

Unless you have been hiding under a rock somewhere, you have probably heard or seen the word “eclipse”.  A solar eclipse to be specific.  A lunar eclipse is a different astronomical phenomenon.  We will discuss that more when we look to the night sky on July 27, 2018.
     Speaking of hiding under a rock, the moon will be hiding the sun from us on August 21.  This article will not be flooded with facts about the eclipse as there have been plenty and the information has been repeated several times.  Library patrons have offered their opinions ranging from not caring whatsoever, to being scared of the mass traffic chaos to come.  I am anxious to see what it will be like from the comfort of my porch.
     Websites say any breezes we have that day will dissipate.  We haven’t had that many strong winds lately to speak of anyway.
     “Shadow bands” will move across the ground in a ripple/wave type effect.  That could prove to be interesting.
     The temperature is said to go down 10-15 degrees.  It has been fairly cool by August standards, so that shouldn’t affect us too much.
     They say birds will stop chirping and may come in to roost.  Now this will be of particular interest to chicken owners, peacock owners, and us goose owners that have geese that gather under the yard light each evening.
     I had thought about taking pictures or videos of the whole 1 minute and 11 second event, but people tend to miss out on the “just being there” and “experiencing the moment” like the use of our phones have done with the cute antics of our children or grandchildren.  I’ll borrow clips from the professionals and make it mine.
     Happy and Safe Eclipse watching!
(We have approved glasses, Moon Pies, Sunny Delight, Eclipse gum to chew while watching eclipse themed movies, and “worksheets” to complete for Saturday’s pre-eclipse day.)

Here’s what’s happening at the library!

The Old Farmer’s Almanac has me intrigued.  My children’s babysitter, we were lucky enough to have 10 of their early years, looked to the Almanac not only for times to plant her garden, but also weaning babies from the bottle, and when to cut their hair for optimum regrowth.
     I never followed up on how her garden grew, although the kids came home with stories of “helping Margie” in the dirt, carrying in produce, and trying fresh vegetables for the first time.  No better preschool could have been had.
     There was no follow up on whether the dates we chose to cut their hair worked either, still they all have full heads of hair.
     Weaning them from their bottles at a year old also must have worked, as they do very well drinking their milk from a glass at 22, 26, and 29 years of age.
     The Almanac claims to be 80% correct in their predictions.  They were off only by a week with these cooler temperatures we’ve been having to start the month of August.  They have wedding weather predictions that are used by some, but the Almanac still suggests renting tents just in case the wedding date falls in that 20% non-accurate rate.
     The people at the Almanac forecast the weather 18 months ahead of time and still have an 80% accuracy rate.  Meteorologists of today are skeptical about the 1792 weather predicting methods of Almanac’s founder, Robert B. Thomas, but there must be some validity to the 225 year process.
     If you care to check out a couple predictions to end the summer, there’s the one about best fishing days from August 21 to September 6.  Or the one that claims 50 meteors per hour will be seen to the northeast from August 11-13.
     Or how about trying the one “soft words warming hard hearts”?
     Happy Reading!

Here’s what’s happening at the library!

According to the Old Farmer’s Almanac – an annual publication containing a calendar for the coming year of statistical information as anniversaries, sunrises, sunsets, phases of the moon, astronomical or meteorological information, etc., we are in the middle of the Dog Days of Summer.  July 3 to August 11 are the 40 days of Dog Days, although some of the hottest and humid days come after the 11th.
     Dog Days, as it is called, is influenced by the rising of the Dog Star, Sirius.  According to the Almanac, the bright Dog Star seen at sunrise really didn’t and doesn’t influence the weather, but “for the ancient Egyptians, Sirius appeared just before the season of the Nile’s flooding, so they used the star as a “watchdog” for that event. Since Sirius’ rising also coincided with a time of extreme heat, the connection with hot, sultry weather was made for all time:  Dog Days bright and clear indicate a happy year.  But when accompanied by rain, for better times our hopes are vain.”
     Sirius is part of the constellation Canis Major the Greater Dog as seen portrayed in the library window.  The Dog Star is our brightest star and can be seen as it ascends in the east before dawn on late summer mornings.
     This star information in this first of the month article comes as August will be a pretty spectacular month due to the full moon on August 7, Canis Major constellation with the Dog Star during Dog Days until August 11, and last, but not least, the 2017 Solar Eclipse on August 21. (More on that event later)
     Come in and check out the “star” titles selected plus 2017 Old Farmer’s Almanac website or the 2017 issue of the almanac, and the 25 new book titles that just arrived last week.
     By the way, how much is the moon worth?  One dollar, because it has four quarters.  And, how does the man-in-the-moon cut his hair? Eclipse it!
     Happy Reading!

Here’s what’s happening at the library!

Mentioned once before in this library article was that fact that workshops/webinars/classes are given to library personnel to turn a simple caregiver of the library into Super-librarian!
Maybe that’s a stretch, but learning anything new or exercising the brain in any way could not hurt anyone.
Listen up, ‘cuz this is big!
I attended a meeting from the State Library of Kansas offering FREE Universal Classes. Over 500 daily updated Universal classes that ANYONE can take for increased knowledge by watching the videos, or earning CEU credit (Continuing Education Units) in which a real professor will grade lessons and give feedback. At the end of the class, certificates are given suitable for framing. How cool is that? How impressive would that be hanging on your display wall?
All you need is a Kansas Library Card…..FREE!
The range of classes seem endless. I’ll have a flyer in the library with a partial listing of classes available or you can get on the Universal website through the State Library of Kansas and choose your class.
Available subjects include computer training, finance, history, art, business, career training, health and nutrition, crafts and hobbies, basic writing and math skills, pet and animal care, etc..
Repeat. All of this FREE with a State Library Card of Kansas plus access to thousands of digital book titles from their library.
Come on in.
Test my Kansas State Library patron sign up skills.
Try a Universal Class of interest to you….FREE!
This is mind-blowing!
I can’t wait to help you out.
Happy Universal Learning

Here’s what’s happening at the library!

The Build a Better World summer reading theme was thought about literally in here.  Thoughts of bridges, buildings, hammers, nails, boards came to mind, but that isn’t exactly what “they” meant about Building a Better World.
     Any activities that patrons participated in the library this summer from themed dot to dots, color pages, sending community members birthday cards or, of course, reading helped to Build a Better World.  These builders will receive a gift of participation towards the end of the summer.  These projects weren’t advertised.  Word of mouth goes a long way in a small town.  Coming into the library without the use of bribes was the goal.  The number of toolbox prizes in the display case shows it worked.
     But what about those little acts of kindnesses done everyday that don’t get prizes?  Holding the door open for someone, bringing the librarian cookies and fresh garden veggies (no hints here), compliments, invitations, are small acts that promote a Better World.
     Reading also promotes well-read, intelligent children and adults that can learn to see different ways of looking at things through the author’s well chosen words.
     New books come into the library every month and new rotated books every three months.  Build on your Better Reading World by coming in to see what the library has to offer on these hot lazy days of summer!
  Maybe “I Want to Help” by Abel N. Willin
              “Hot Dog” by Frank Furter
              “I Hate the Sun” by Gladys Knight
              “If I Invited Him….” by Woody Kum
Happy Building!