Here’s what’s happening at the library!

Mentioned once before in this library article was that fact that workshops/webinars/classes are given to library personnel to turn a simple caregiver of the library into Super-librarian!
Maybe that’s a stretch, but learning anything new or exercising the brain in any way could not hurt anyone.
Listen up, ‘cuz this is big!
I attended a meeting from the State Library of Kansas offering FREE Universal Classes. Over 500 daily updated Universal classes that ANYONE can take for increased knowledge by watching the videos, or earning CEU credit (Continuing Education Units) in which a real professor will grade lessons and give feedback. At the end of the class, certificates are given suitable for framing. How cool is that? How impressive would that be hanging on your display wall?
All you need is a Kansas Library Card…..FREE!
The range of classes seem endless. I’ll have a flyer in the library with a partial listing of classes available or you can get on the Universal website through the State Library of Kansas and choose your class.
Available subjects include computer training, finance, history, art, business, career training, health and nutrition, crafts and hobbies, basic writing and math skills, pet and animal care, etc..
Repeat. All of this FREE with a State Library Card of Kansas plus access to thousands of digital book titles from their library.
Come on in.
Test my Kansas State Library patron sign up skills.
Try a Universal Class of interest to you….FREE!
This is mind-blowing!
I can’t wait to help you out.
Happy Universal Learning

Here’s what’s happening at the library!

The Build a Better World summer reading theme was thought about literally in here.  Thoughts of bridges, buildings, hammers, nails, boards came to mind, but that isn’t exactly what “they” meant about Building a Better World.
     Any activities that patrons participated in the library this summer from themed dot to dots, color pages, sending community members birthday cards or, of course, reading helped to Build a Better World.  These builders will receive a gift of participation towards the end of the summer.  These projects weren’t advertised.  Word of mouth goes a long way in a small town.  Coming into the library without the use of bribes was the goal.  The number of toolbox prizes in the display case shows it worked.
     But what about those little acts of kindnesses done everyday that don’t get prizes?  Holding the door open for someone, bringing the librarian cookies and fresh garden veggies (no hints here), compliments, invitations, are small acts that promote a Better World.
     Reading also promotes well-read, intelligent children and adults that can learn to see different ways of looking at things through the author’s well chosen words.
     New books come into the library every month and new rotated books every three months.  Build on your Better Reading World by coming in to see what the library has to offer on these hot lazy days of summer!
  Maybe “I Want to Help” by Abel N. Willin
              “Hot Dog” by Frank Furter
              “I Hate the Sun” by Gladys Knight
              “If I Invited Him….” by Woody Kum
Happy Building!

Here’s what’s happening at the library!

Everyone’s a critic!
Book Van books to the front…criticism. Air conditioning too cold…comment. Children’s movies to the back….judgement. Children’s hour limit on computer and Xbox…opinion.
Opposite of those criticisms are some compliments given to this weekly article. Patrons say they enjoy them. Few say it’s the first thing they read. One patron said the article is read in Texas!
Then….wham! Someone, who shall remain nameless, burst that little self-absorbed bubble built in my head. The criticism? The articles “list” too much.
It’s alright. Criticisms mean they’ve read the article, they feel comfortable enough to say something, and it makes me try harder and not become stagnant with the articles. There the lists go again.
You have to “list” in the library.
Sometimes I ask the question, “What types of movies would you like to see in here?” The answers? Horror, Rom-Com, animated, family, Sci-fi.
I ask, “What authors would you like to see in here?” James Patterson, Susan Mallary, Nora Roberts, Danielle Steel, John Grisham. More lists.
I look at the Red Box list for the recent movie release list and most popular. I look at the New York Times for their bestseller list.
You can’t please everybody and it would cost a fortune if you did. Many times I hit on just the right book or movie picks. People are nice enough to tell me that.
So there. The library is full of lists. How about that list of people with their list of overdue fines on each of the books listed? Hmmm.
So, daughter, I wouldn’t necessarily call the lists in these articles “lists”. They are more like “options”.
Happy Reading, Computer Researching, or Picking Out a Movie!

Here’s what’s happening at the library!

The Summer season came in quietly on June 20 at 11:24 p.m. according to the Old Farmer’s Almanac.  It will end at 3:02 p.m. on September 22.  There is a lot to get done in these next three months.  Swimming continues, ballgames, and wheat harvest, too.  Coming up are county fairs, town festivals with rodeos and tractor pulls, and the 4th of July.  This isn’t to mention slipping in a family vacation.  Noting the August school start date seems too cruel to bring up so early in the season, so it will go unsaid.
     It has been proven time and time again that there is educational loss from the very young students to college age during these summer months.  The importance of “using it before losing it” is so true.  Adults, have you ever not done something for a time and then it fails to come to you when you’ve tried it again?  It’s not dementia you are experiencing, it’s just not using and exercising the gray matter.
     As with any exercise program, start slow.  There is no need to grab an edition of War and Peace.  The graphic novels, otherwise known as comics, a novella, or short stories from your favorite author might get you started back into the reading habit.  There are such things as BookShots by best-selling author  James Patterson and others that are quick, fun reads to squeeze in between swim lessons, ballgames, and loads of wheat.
     With many of the Summer activities going on, why did the ballerina quit all of them? They were just tu-tu hard.
     Happy Summer Reading!

Here’s what’s happening at the library!

Does something FREE make it less valued?  Because you spend lots of money for something, does it make it more treasured?
     Good money was given to Santa one Christmas for my eldest son a truck that made motor noises, unloading noises, and a blaring horn.  He was interested for a while until he saw his older cheaper truck with dents and the year before mud still stuck to it.  He made his own noises, starting and stopping the sounds as needed.  Cheaper was more valued.
     A child receives a birthday gift costing over what a parent probably should have paid and what does he play with?  The FREE box.   Cheaper was more valued.
     Let’s talk libraries.  Because people get to use books, magazines, DVDs, computers, video games for FREE, does that mean we get to treat them roughly because we didn’t have to pay for them?
     People pay $6 – $9.50 for movie tickets.  When they pay that much to see a movie, they do not want cell phones, noisy kids, or loud talking adults interrupting the show.  Sometimes movies, books, magazines, computers, and computer games are used and returned in poor to bad condition.  Why?
     If people had to pay to use these items, would the items get treated better?   Think of the days of VHS tapes.  If you did not rewind them, you got charged extra by the movie rental places.
     But if the public libraries charged for all of their services, then the libraries would cease to be accessible to the public.
     The library has FREE checkout of books, so no need to pay $35 per title.
     The library has FREE checkout of magazines, so no need for subscriptions.
     The library has FREE use of computers and internet access, so no need to pay for the service or a computer.
     The library has FREE State Library access to books on tape and machines for the visually impaired with new titles and select magazines, so no going without good books.
     The library has FREE movies available, so no need to pay for satellite, cable, or theater ticket prices.
     Let’s use and return those items better than we found them for others to enjoy.
     What if these titles got damaged or lost?
Rules for Living by Sharon Sharalike
A Children’s Songbook by Skip Tumalu
Lewd Novels by Ray See
Fish Story by Rod Enreel
How to Read a Book by Paige Turner
Keep it Happy Reading!

Here’s what’s happening at the library!

  I have been lucky enough to have loved three men in my life.  Is that too much information for a library article?
     None of those three were/are avid readers as compared to the men that visit this library.  Although, if you do not get technical about what is considered reading, Grass & Grain, Successful Farming, The Hanover News, and The Westmoreland Recorder were read from front to back.
     Now just like Mother’s Day, people tend to reminisce around these Hallmark holidays.  It is actually a fairly new national holiday.  It was in 1972 when President Richard Nixon declared it be celebrated on the third Sunday in June as was first suggested by Grace Clayton from West Virginia in 1908.  She wanted a day to honor her father and the 200 fathers who had died in a mining accident in her state.  Two others, including President Woodrow Wilson, tried to make it a permanent national holiday before the 1972 declaration.
     I was told to give a list of books in the library article, but if these fathers are like most, they judge the book by its cover.  Know that new titles are ordered at the end of each month.  Black Book, El Paso, Edge, The Highwayman, Night School, Billy Lynn’s Long Half-time Walk, and A Wretched and Precarious Situation are just a few of the new titles that the fathers and men ought to enjoy.  Speaking of new, the Rotating Book Van will rotate another 350 titles into the library on June 29. You really have to come in and “judge” for yourself.
     The three men I have loved, you ask?  The first was named Julius (my dad), another one was Ludwig (my father-in-law), and for 31 years another great father to our three children, Galen.
     Mark Twain once said, “When I was a boy of 14, my father was so ignorant I could hardly stand to have the old man around.  But when I got to be 21, I was astonished at how much he had learned in seven years.”
     Happy Father’s Day Reading!

Here’s what’s happening at the library!

Did you hear that this year’s summer reading program’s theme is Build a Better World?  This is not a repeat of last week’s article, only an extension.
     Small towns have a lot of advantages to large impersonal cities.  People get to see the same blockbuster movies as the big cities at half the price.  If you wait a bit, those movies are free at the library.
     They have quality stage productions at the Opera House from talented local performers to professional actors, comedians, and musicians.
     The Weaver Hotel offers beautiful accommodations while attending anything you may be in town for.
     How about dining?  Burger Bashes, Boy Scout 1/2 Chicken Barbeques, church dinners, and more, offer wonderful meals, reasonably priced, and proceeds always going for something worthwhile.
     Most importantly, small towns have caring groups that offer their time, money, ideas, and energy to those needing help.
     The Annual River Run, sponsored by many including this library, took place this past weekend with fun for everyone and proceeds going to a worthy one near and dear to my heart.
     A local patron returned a small piece of audio equipment and a stack of audio books for free return from the State Library of Kansas after her mother had passed away.  She said the audiobooks “saved her life” during her stay.  She hoped others in the local care home and those homebound would take advantage of this free service. (Select magazines are also available.)
     Build a Better World by not only attending these events, but… (this article wouldn’t seem right if the library wasn’t mentioned) send a birthday wish to the chosen community members, or Father’s Day cards to 9 of those community men from the library, or donating gently used items to the Warehouse, or donating once watched or read books and movies to the library.
     Build that Better World by sending cards, donating, or returning items to the library for others to enjoy, or paying the fines for those overdue movies and books.  (Fine money is used for new movies, copier paper and ink, magazine subscriptions, cards, stamps, etc.)
Knock, knock.
Who’s there?
Winnie.
Winnie who?
Winnie you going to bring back that overdue book/movie, hmmm?
Happy Building!

Here’s what’s happening at the library!

“Build a Better World” is the summer reading theme for public libraries this summer.  What will you do to make our world better?  My suggestion is to READ, no matter your age.  Become more aware, become more literate, become well read.
     Reading gives you all the tools to build better futures, relationships, senses of humor, dreams, imaginations, life, lunches, skills, world peace, and on and on.
     If you don’t know how to do something from fixing cars to fixing supper – read “how to” books.  Want to know how the rich and famous live?….read a bibliography.  Want to have some insight into the future?…sci-fi books may help.  Star Trek, Lost in Space, and the Jetsons weren’t too far off.  Want a little love in your life?…..read a romance novel.  Don’t want to make the same mistakes?….read some history.
     Build a well read young child…picture books.
     Build a better tween…..junior fiction.
     Build a better teen…..young adult selections.
     Build a better student for next fall……READ!
     A little girl came into the library wanting to know what she would “get” if she read books this summer.  I didn’t have the time or energy to explain to her what I wrote above.  It was a gold star in my day and I was thrilled seeing them on my reading log.
     There will be small prizes given to coincide with our world theme, but don’t expect huge incentives to get you to read, that needs to come from within.
     My challenge to you this summer is to think how your book connects to world events, world news, world happenings.
     TOGETHER, Waterville, we’ll build a better world over the summer. You’ll see!
Happy Summer Reading!

Here’s what’s happening at the library!

As a child, I would hear my Grandma Nanny talk of Decoration Day.  I got the honor, although I didn’t know that then, but the honor of going to Sunset Cemetery in Manhattan and “decorating” my Great Grandma and Grandpa’s graves with Nanny’s own garden grown flowers.  Her hillside of peonies were still in bloom as I recall.  Never did I tire of the stories of Great Grandparents “Bang” and Fritz.
      I would then get the chance to go with my folks to decorate my Grandma and Grandpa Umscheid’s graves in the St. Joseph’s Cemetery at Flush.  For years now, my mother and her sister have taken over that task and I feel guilty not visiting those graves and many more since, especially on Memorial Day.
     Decoration Day started on May 30, 1868 to decorate the graves of Civil War soldiers.  Twenty years later, the name of the day was changed to Memorial Day, still to honor the men and women who died in all the wars.
     Once again, we have taken this honored day of remembrance to light up our grills, get the boats out on the lakes, go to a blockbuster movie, or take in Memorial Day sales.
     Before Memorial Day this year, come to the library to read stories, glance at Waterville memorabilia brought in by Ann Walter and others, or go to local cemetery services for the men and women we should honor before our own festivities begin.
     Check out a military related book or two on Waterville’s Nickel Day Saturday and READ your way into the beginning of summer.
     “I’m proud to be an American,
      Where at least I know I’m free,
      And I won’t forget the men who died
      Who gave that right to me.” -L. Greenwood
Welcome to Nickel Day and Happy Memorial Day!

Here’s what’s happening at the library!

What can be said about Moms that hasn’t been said before?  Not much.
     Their skills, styles, personalities are as varied as the number of books in this library.  Some are filled with lots of laughter and humor.  Some are sad with lots of hardships.  Some are exciting with adventure each step or page of the way. Still others are filled with facts or matter of facts.
     If you are lucky, you’ve had a mixture of a little bit of everything, but those novels and moms are rare.  Not many get to be labeled a classic. (Judged over a period of time to be of the highest quality and outstanding of its kind.)  And, you can’t judge the book or the mom by its cover.  Many turn out to be some of best, despite their outer layer.
     No one should every say that motherhood is an “easy read” either.  But if you knew how hard something was going to be, you’d never start it, and if you never started it, you wouldn’t know how wonderful, gratifying, thought provoking it can be.
     Sometimes it takes after the book finished or mother is gone before you realize how much you learned from them. Don’t you remember learning these from your mom?
Never give up. (The Little Engine that Could)
Treasure friendships. (Winnie the Pooh)
Help others. (Charlotte’s Web)
Every story has two sides. (The True Story of Three Little Pigs)
Don’t judge. (Pride and Prejudice)
Don’t try to change others. (To Kill a Mockingbird)
Being smart is not something to be ashamed of. (Harry Potter)
Family is always the most important. (Hunger Games)
Define yourself. (Anne of Green Gables)
Words are valuable and insanely powerful. (The Book Thief)
Happy Mother’s Day……Reading!